Postcards from Croatia: Marjan, Split

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The view of Marjan Hill, from Split

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The view of Split, from Marjan

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One of the chapels and churches on Marjan

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Views of the island of Solta

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Marjan Rocks

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Hermits’ abodes

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Taking a closer look  

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One of the beaches on Marjan, and people swimming in the sea (in mid September)

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Another look at the caves

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Leaving

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11 Comments

  1. a beautiful place!!1 thanks for the tour.

    It’s a pleasure! There will be more coming! I’m thinking of making this ‘postcards from croatia’ a permanenet fixture here…

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  2. thebuddingcook

     /  28 April, 2008

    How picturesque!

    🙂 hope you enjoyed it!

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  3. Thanks for taking us along – Croatia looks lovely. The weather must’ve been terrific!

    Hi Arundhati! Yes, the weather was indeed fabulous! This was mid-September, which is often very warm in Croatia. In fact, people swim in the sea (comfortably) up until October.

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  4. Beautiful. I want to live in a hermit cave!

    🙂 Especially in a cave with a view like that (of the islands and the sea).

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  5. God, I miss my home town, but next week I’m going to Split for five days! yuuupy!

    Me, too! Wish I could go there now, too!🙂 I have a few good friends in Split, and love visiting it!

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  6. Oh how I wish the two weeks I just spent in Italy had been in Croatia instead. The few days I spent in Split were so magical. Speaking of Croatia, do you have a recipe for Croatia bread (not Easter bread) in English? The loaves I tasted were so magical and I’ve been trying to recreate them at home for the last two years with no real progress. If I remember correctly, the bread tasted like it had corn in it. Thanks for the stroll down memory lane.

    glad you enjoyed Split, ann! And welcome to my blog!

    hm, which bread do you mean? where did you have it? i suspect this may have had something with the way it was cooked, if it was ‘kruh ispod peke’, roughly translated as bread under peka. Peka is a type of ancient oven. it’s made of cast iron, and it has a concave lid which is put over whatever you’re baking. the lid is then covered with burning wood.

    in any case, i’d love to help you, so if you give me a few more details, i’ll see what i can do!🙂

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  7. Carrie

     /  28 April, 2008

    Wow!
    Your pictures make me want to travel there today. I live in Minnesota and there are flurries here with an overcast sky – I had to pull my winter coat back out of the closet! SO thanks for sharing these warm, sunny pictures!

    Gosh, I know how you feel! It’s raining her in the UK, it’s cold and miserable… I too am yearning for the sun!

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  8. Prelepo!

    Fala! I dobrodosla na moj blog!🙂

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  9. Absolutely beautiful!

    Ta, Nic! Glad you like the photos!

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  10. vermaercke herman

     /  23 August, 2009

    can jou give me the recepie for peka kruh .i will like to make this beateful braet at home
    thanks

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  11. Dear Herman,

    Peka is a way of cooking the bread, rather than a recipe.

    A ‘peka’ consists of two parts made of cast iron. The bottom part is like a round baking tray, with a tall-ish lip, and the top is domed. The oven tray with the food is placed into the peka, this is put into the fire, and then covered with burning embers. We usually use wood, rather than coal.

    You can cook meat, fish and octopus in this way, as well as bread. It’s delicious.

    I’m not suggesting you build a peka in your back garden here. What you could try to approximate it is using a cast iron casserole, such as Le Creuset and place your bread in it.

    I could ask my mum for the bread recipe if you still want. What I remember is that she uses fresh yeast, and a mixure of wholemeal and white flour.

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